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Shelf Life

Alexander Graham Bell said, “If anything else, preparation is the key to success.”


If COVID taught us anything, it’s that emergencies happen quickly and being prepared makes a big difference. When we were having trouble buying milk, eggs, toilet paper, hand sanitizer, or plastic gloves, having some storage of nonperishable items in our home gave us great peace of mind. Storing some food and supplies for emergencies can help us to be prepared and know we can make it through a variety of trying times. Strikes in the trucking industry, a flood or break that affects our water quality, loss of a job, personal tragedy, or, of course, a pandemic are all events that can affect our food and water sources. These or other scenarios can leave our family without our usual supplies. We can prepare for these possibilities by using a small part of our income on a regular basis to store up for such events.


There are many sources to find information and advice regarding storing the necessities your family will need in such a case. There are also many companies that provide large cans, freeze dried meals, storage shelves, and other supplies that make stocking food more convenient. I have been interested to see that homesteading, canning, owning chickens, farming... many of these lost arts have been on the rise and, due to the internet, have been shared through blogs and websites more easily. These are also great resources for home food storage information. Here are a few of my favorite sources:


Colorado State University extension has an in- depth page about food and water storage, including suggested amountsand tips for storing. See extension.colostate.edu/disaster-web- sites/food-safety-and-storage-for-emergency- preparedness/.


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints teaches a lot about self-reliance and preparation. Their website offers information about food storage and financial preparedness, and you can even search for calculators to aid in these endeavors.


Visit providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org.


Jill Winger and her husband decided to live a different life than many and moved out to a farmstead far from civilization. They have been documenting their journey of learning to live off their land. In her blog, Jill shares many helpful tips about gardening, canning, and food storage. Find out more at www.theprairiehomestead.com/ blog.

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